The Transparent RRSP: Thanksliving Day Weekend

The week of October 2
  • On Oct 2, I bought 10 shares of ZPR.TO at $11.61. This cost me $116.10.
  • To my horror, I realized later on that I meant to buy 15 shares of ZPR, not just 10. So I ended up buying another 5 shares the next day at $11.67 a share (6 cents more!). This cost me $58.35. Aw phooey!
  • I would have bought more ZPR on Wednesday when I finally had more funds in the account, but the price was up higher by that point. Instead, I bought 15 shares of GRL.TO at $7.96 per share. This cost $119.55.

I have $37.92 in cash left in my RRSP.

GRL and ZPR

Price charts for GRL and ZPR on freestockcharts.com

I bought both of these stocks earlier this year. In early January, I got 50 shares of ZPR for $10.86 and 50 shares of GRL for $7.74 in mid-February. When you work out the average price, it looks like this:

ZPR

  • 50 shares @ $10.86 + $0.50 in commission* = $543.50
  • 10 shares @ $11.61 = $116.10
  • 5 shares @ $11.67 = $58.35
  • This totals to $717.95
  • Take the total cost of $717.95 and divide it by 65 shares. You get $11.05 a share for ZPR.

* I forgot to buy this under the “Free ETF Investment” commission structure with Virtual Brokers. I did remember to choose the correct commission structure this time around. At least I got one important thing right.

GRL

  • 50 shares @ $7.74 + $0.50 in commission = $387.50
  • 15 shares @ $7.96 + $0.15 in commission = $119.55
  • This totals to $507.05.
  • Divide $507.05 by 65 shares = $7.80 a share

Oh, what fun math can be! 

I really need to work this out for all the stocks I’ve averaged or scaled into. I scaled into a few of my other stocks last week — as I’ve been doing throughout the summer. I wish I could be a little more type A when it comes to tracking.

My new year’s resolution was to get more organized with tracking my trades. I still use post-it reminders occasionally. I now have two bulletin boards and a whiteboard to post better visual reminders for my trade ideas, upcoming strategies, and items that need attention. While I’ve made improvements in keeping up with things, I’m still floundering in the tracking department.


Thanksgiving Day 

Tomorrow my in-laws are coming to stay with us for a few days. They know it’s going to be a vegetarian ‘Thanksliving’ (the term courtesy of Jesse Eisenberg), so I’m sure they’re getting their turkey fill tonight with the other half of the family in Calgary before they fly in tomorrow.

I’ve got yummy Tofurky on the menu (don’t knock it until you try it) along with savoury kale chips, grilled veggies, dessert cookies, and other things that go well with good wine and craft beer. This may seem unappetizing to many, but we’re decent cooks for a couple of veg-heads and have yet to disappoint our guests. Cholesterol levels will not be spiking tomorrow!

I’ve got some cleaning and prep to do tonight so that tomorrow, I can trade in the morning for my US margin account as the US markets are open. Once I’m done trading, Thanksgiving cooking – and drinking – begin in the early afternoon.

Happy Thanksgiving to all!

 

 

The Transparent RRSP: Portfolio Choices

The Week of Oct 2
  • Over the weekend, I deposited $150 into the RRSP. I will have $328.22 in cash in the account as it takes a couple of business days for the transfer to show up in the account.

September was a bit of hectic month for me. Other than scaling into THCX.V, a stock which I already owned in my TFSA, I didn’t do much in the portfolio department. Sometimes you just have to take care of other business before you can properly take care of the business.

Last week, I finished the Trader Training Course with the Canadian Securities Institute. The night I found out I passed, I immediately signed up for the Technical Analysis Course. Even though I read charts all the time and dream about them in my sleep, I always like to read up on the basics. The text and course have been recently updated and I must say, I’m pretty impressed so far with the really clear explanations. I’ve read a lot of other books on technical analysis and this one is the best one yet. It better be because it costs A LOT more!


Now that I will have more cash, I’m considering buying more shares of ZPR. Check it out.

ZPR

Price chart for the ZPR ETF on freestockcharts.com

In the summer, I was curious to see if this would continue trading sideways. It still is, but it could be starting to break out. The worst that could happen is that if the market turns, this one will too after I enter, but I don’t really care. They say you should never have a bias when it comes to your investments, but I can’t help but like this one. I have shares of this in my TFSA as well.

Since it’ll take a couple of days for me to have the other $150 in this account, I’ll put a limit order in for 15 shares on Monday (tomorrow). Once the other cash shows up, I’ll get more. We’ll see how it works out.


Some More Stock Picks

I like the monthly charts for the following stocks:

  • CPG.TO
  • WCP.TO
  • ERF.TO
  • EFN.TO (This one needs another week or so to set up better.)
  • ACB.TO (This could use another week or two to set up.)
  • EXE.TO (I already own shares of this. It needs to tighten up, but I’m watching this one closely.)
ACB

Price chart for ACB.TO on freestockcharts.com

ACB is interesting because it’s a young stock. When you don’t have much to go on for the longer term charts of the weekly, monthly, and yearly, then you have to look shorter term and rely on the daily, hourly, or even shorter intraday timeframes (30 min, 15 min). It becomes more of a risk when you have less historical information to make your decisions on. In these situations, you just manage your risk accordingly. Even though it’s a cheap stock, you might want to buy fewer shares. As time goes on and you have more information and encounter better setups, you can always buy more shares.

I say this because I normally wouldn’t enter a stock that has gone up for six straight weeks as seen on the weekly chart. It would have to have an amazing monthly chart, which this one doesn’t yet because it’s still new. However, the daily chart is great in that is has a lot of trade volume supporting its most recent uptrend. What’s also attractive about this uptrend is that it’s had four pullbacks testing the trendline since it started in late August.

I’m a little hesitant to buy a new weed stock for the RRSP, but I think I will take on a few shares of this for my TFSA.

As always, do your necessary research and only risk what you’re comfortable with!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Transparent RRSP: More Thoughts on the Market

I posted on Monday that I had bought another 16 shares of LFE.TO at $6.12. This cost me $97.92 + 0.16 of commission. I now have $60.90 of cash remaining in my account. This was at the same price I got the previous 24 shares of LFE.TO at, giving me 40 shares of this stock.

Currently, I’m not crazy about entering any new positions given the market. I would prefer it to have a more substantial correction before it resumes going up. My preference would be for the market to just slightly sell off below February’s lows. The market could just move sideways for the rest of March, which I’ll be satisfied with. If the market isn’t going to have a correction, then it at least needs to take a break from going straight up.

When the market is operating near a peak like this, I tend to find that stocks with great setups are merely shortlived opportunities in that they might only be in the profit zone for a few days – then people get scared at the slightest hint of a reversal and sell their positions to take their profits.

Another thing I find when the market is iffy: investors tend to gravitate towards stocks doing their own thing regardless of what the market is doing. That is the only reason why I bought more shares of LFE. I said earlier this month that I didn’t want to take any new positions for the RRSP until the market had a decent correction. This stock was resilient during some market weakness and looked like it was taking off.

When I am doing something that goes against my intentions, I have to ask myself, “If this stock takes off without me, will I be upset?” Some setups are dodgy enough that I wouldn’t have regret even if it works because I’ve learned that if I took such setups every time, I’d have consistently worse returns. The setup LFE was demonstrating is the kind you just can’t ignore.

Below is a comparison of the daily and weekly charts of LFE to one of my favourite market index ETFs to watch, the XIC. I also watch the actual TSX Composite Index, however, I prefer looking at the XIC because I get a better view of the trading volume in the market.

lfe

I haven’t lost sight of the increased amount of risk when taking trades in a market like this. I feel that LFE will trade on its own page for a while. Eventually, it’ll likely be more affected by the market. Hopefully, that happens when it’s at a much higher price!

 

The Transparent RRSP: A Quick Update

Action Taken the Week of March 13

It’s really hard to schedule my blog posts because it’s just as hard to schedule opportunities! I much prefer to write about the Transparent RRSP towards the end of the week after watching the markets for the week. I will do another post either this Thursday or Friday. I just really wanted to share this recent trade in case others might want to consider this opportunity.


 

 

LFE2

LFE charts on freestockcharts.com

 

After I first bought shares of LFE.TO, the stock went up only to come down again and consolidate longer. I loved how the range got tighter and held up beautifully – while the market during the same time came down. It always gets my attention when a stock holds stronger than the market. It’s now trading above all the previous prices in this consolidation. Could this be taking off?

The Transparent RRSP: Post #7

Actions Taken the Week of February 13th
  • Bought 50 shares of Global Real Estate Dividend Growers (ticker: GRL.TO) at $7.74 per share on February 14th
  • This cost me $387.00 plus 0.50 cents commission

I now have $147.60 remaining in my RRSP left to invest. If I don’t find anything cheap enough to invest in, I’ll probably wait until my next regular deposit of $150 in the first week of March before I can afford to buy another stock.


 

grl

GRL’s Price History Chart on freestockcharts.com

 

I personally like the newness of this stock. The lowest it’s ever been is $7.30, so buying it 0.44 cents above that seemed like a good deal to me, especially if it goes up from here. It’s possible this can still go down to the $5 area. Stocks tend to test major price points of $5 multiples. If this doesn’t go down, then the first target area would be around $10 where there’ll be some profit-taking and then some more buying before going up even more.

I really liked this chart; although I will admit that my entry was aggressive and possibly premature. What I’d love to see this stock do is continue to trade in the $7.50 to $8.00 range. If this consolidates for another month or two in this area, you can bet I’ll be buying more shares before it breaks out. What’s also great is that this stock pays a monthly dividend of 0.05 cents per share.

Canadian Stock Picks

I’m the luckiest girl trader in the world! While I’ve been busy hauling butt at work the last week, my man, JP, has been going through the entire TSX stocks list alphabetically, just looking at charts. He just finished “S” this morning.

I’ve gone through his list so far and I’ll provide them for you below under headings that should help organize them. These don’t all meet my volume minimum criteria of 10K shares per day, but below I’ve listed stocks I think are worth considering.

My Top Chart Picks 

These stocks have great charts (daily, weekly, and monthly). They could make a move soon, or have already started.

  • ARZ (This is a pharmaceutical company, so its risk level is MUCH HIGHER. Take fewer shares if you can’t resist.)
  • CF
  • CUF.UN (This is a REIT.)
  • CUS
  • GRL
  • ITX
  • KLS
  • MSI
  • NAL
  • ONC
  • SOY
Great Charts on Most Time Frames

I would prefer for these stocks to have a better setup on the weekly and/or monthly charts. This means they could consolidate longer, or trade closer to the last selloff period (marked by a pivot candle on the charts). Otherwise, they look pretty good.

  • ABT
  • BDT
  • BEI.UN (This is a REIT.)
  • CSW.A
  • MKP
  • MRE
  • REI.UN (This is a REIT.)
  • SRV.UN (This is an income fund.)
Keep Close Watch

These charts seem to be in the middle of setting up. They’re either having a bit of a selloff or they’re currently consolidating. The opportunity to buy could be soon, so keep a close eye on these!

  • AMI
  • CXR
  • ECN
  • IGG
  • LMP
  • MOGO
  • NCU

Some of these pay a dividend, some suspended or reduced their dividends, some don’t pay any. Please do your own research into the company and sector. Keep in mind what you require for your investment needs and expectations, as well as the most appropriate investment account  (RRSP or TFSA, etc.).

I hope to go through more stocks this week. I’ll be posting more, so stay tuned!

 

The Transparent RRSP: Post #6

Actions Taken:
  • Bought 50 shares of Liquor Stores N.A. (ticker symbol: LIQ.TO) at $10.46 this morning
  • 50 shares x $10.46= $523.00 plus 0.50 cents in commission. I paid $523.50.
  • I also deposited another $300 this week because I got birthday money (my parents-in-law tend to spoil me!)
  • There is now $535.60 left to be invested for the next opportunity

Alcohol is a consumer staple that will carry people through good and bad times. For this reason, I believe it’s a good portfolio staple. Right now, what I want to do for this RRSP account is start it off with some solid stocks. I like to think of it as having good wardrobe basics in your closet first before leaping to more flashy and frilly gear!

This wonderful stock also pays a monthly dividend. I own this already in my TFSA at a nice lower price of $7.88. I like it because it pays a monthly dividend (currently at 0.03 cents a share).


liq

It’s possible this could go lower in price. The pattern setups on the daily and weekly charts don’t inspire excitement and confidence in me. I do, however, like the clean setup on the monthly chart. To me, the larger time frame is more important than the shorter time frames. The current entry at $10.46 is close to where it last sold off at $9.80 as indicated by the pink arrow.

In case this stock doesn’t go down and continues higher from this place, I took action and bought 50 shares. If the setup were a bit better, I would’ve bought more shares. 

If it does go down more in price and then sets up again later on with a nice consolidation pattern, then you can bet I’ll be buying more shares!

 

Couples Who Invest Together Stay Together…Right?

Beach Talk

“What do you mean you have a bunch of money just sitting there?!?”

My forever man, JP, one of the calmest people I’ve ever known, had a mini conniption when I casually told him that I had a large chunk of uninvested cash in my TFSA. I had no explanation to offer other than a sulky, “I’ve been too busy to figure out what to get.” Saying that to someone who is busier than you won’t get you far. Thankfully, this conversation happened on a sunny beach in Florida last week, so it wasn’t hard for him to simmer back down in the face of my cringe-worthy apathy.

“Just buy anything that pays a dividend. Buy more shares of ZPR or SPB. Anything. How else are we going to retire in five to ten and live off dividends if you don’t have those shares? You know what to do. All your money should be working,” he gently advised before taking a deep swig of his particularly strong grapefruit juice and returning to his beach reading. 

I couldn’t argue with him about putting your money to good use – I tell people to do this all the time, after all. Now that I’m back from vacation and resettling into my icy reality, I’m ready to hunker down and start looking for stocks again.

We ‘Split Up’ and Went Our Separate Ways

When we were learning about stocks, JP and I started off trading together. However, we discovered the hard way that we often had different ideas that threatened the other’s need to try something a little off-script. We then split our account into two and started to operate separately. As our respective accounts grew, so did the number of accounts. We each now have three trading accounts.

We now share our ideas, but that doesn’t mean we act on them. Sometimes we’ll take the exact same trade, entry and all, but many of our trades are done without telling the other until later. It was when we started making independent decisions that we started to see our respective portfolios truly take off. The reason I think this improvement in portfolio performance happened is because we wouldn’t get shaken out of our positions due to fear of trade criticism.

In chat rooms, I’ve seen traders and investors criticize each other’s decisions. This is why I left chat rooms. People always share ideas and then sometimes scare each other out of taking chances or out of the trades they already took. It’s already bold enough to take a position, the last thing you need is an outside voice to instill fear or add doubt. If you invest from a position of little faith, you will have incredible difficulty at succeeding financially.

Whether or not we totally agree with each other’s stock picks, JP and I support and trust each other’s decisions because we share the same long-term vision. We want to have a second property in a hot place, we want most of our income to come from our investments, and we want to help others learn how to achieve their financial goals through investing.  Most importantly, we want to help each other become better investors.

Moving Forward in Harmony

For 2017, I resolved to be less of a ragtag investor. JP is so disciplined in that he reviews our stock portfolios – mine and his – almost every day and then he emails me (so I don’t misplace it) his watch list of stocks to pay attention to. I have missed many opportunities. Maybe I should just post his lists for my readers?

I am trying to be more organized and watchful of my stocks. I’m working on being more proactive with my investment ideas, and thanks to weekly blogging, I’m getting a bit better at it. It’s only February so I won’t beat myself up over how far I have yet to go. 

There is rarely a completely straight and easy path to any goal, but my conversation with my partner in life and business reminded me that it’s time to get back on track and to contribute more to our joint efforts. Our future beach bum selves are counting on it.

The Transparent RRSP: Post #2

Actions Taken This Week of January 9th

  • Deposited $150 into the RRSP account which increases my principal to $1150

After buying 50 shares of ZPR at $10.86 per share, I have $456.50 left in the RRSP (I paid 0.50 cents in commission). With another $150, I give myself a better chance to buy enough shares of something else when the opportunity arrives. Having more money gives me the ability to diversify my portfolio.


For most of my working life, I mainly saved any extra money that my expected budget permitted. While this allowed me to contribute more than I normally would from time to time, it still fostered sporadic saving rather than regular savings that could’ve compounded nicely in my investments. There is power in consistency. 

When you’re consistent, you’re better able to determine where you’ll be headed in the future. If you can figure out your rate of return from year to year and factor in your regular contributions, you can see the actual potential of your financial growth. This where a goal is more likely to become a reality, rather than just exist in the back of your mind as a half-baked wish.

The first fundamental concept of investing refers to the compounding effect of your invested money + its previously earned interest = more interest on top of your growing money. I, too, wrote about it in my book because it’s the most basic concept of growth. Interest on growing money is going to be more than interest on a static amount money.

It gets complicated when you try to calculate the rate of return on your portfolio of investments. Ultimately, you want your portfolio at the end of the year to be worth more than it was at the beginning of the year and not just because you’ve been putting money into it. 

So if you put $3000 in three stocks. The best-case scenario would be for them to be worth more year after year so that should you have to sell them at any point, you will make money. You buy stocks to make more money on the sale of them. Never forget this.

Another reason to buy stocks is to make dividend income. For some people, this is their primary reason to buy stocks. It’s a very good reason because if you buy enough dividend-paying shares, you can live off that money. Or it can be reinvested in a DRIP to buy more shares or you can use the cash to buy other stocks.

HOWEVER, you must keep in mind that dividends aren’t a company’s obligation and not all companies pay one. If a company does, it can increase, reduce, or stop its dividend payments to investors if it makes financial sense for them. So, if a company is in trouble and over the years you bought many dividend-paying shares, you’re not only out of income, you face a big capital loss once you sell your shares.

A lot of people can’t get over the varying outcomes that stock investing offers. I mean, you might not make a profit and you might not get your dividends! The reason why I feel it’s important to regularly pump money into your investment account is so that you have capital to buy more than the three stocks in my example. You need to diversify. 

Not all stocks go up and down at the same time. Just because a stock price is less than the price you got it at doesn’t mean it’s in trouble – it’s normal for this to happen and sometimes it’s even healthy. It could take a while before it shines and becomes the star of your portfolio.The nice thing about a well-diversified portfolio is that as performances may be cyclical, over time they should all be going up in value. Having different stocks can smooth out the negative effects of underperformance, capital loss, or a stop on dividend payments.

Having said that, if you diversify too much and have too many stocks from all the sectors, it could start to look like the market. It’s a lot of trouble (and commissions) to diversify only to look like the market (or worse) when you could’ve just bought shares of an index ETF. Don’t over-diversify or else you can dilute the overall performance of your portfolio.

My takeaway point is that you invest your savings regularly so that you can afford to diversify.

I believe investing regularly, reinvesting your gains, plus diversifying your holdings lead to a growth effect that transcends the old compound interest model. With lower interest rates and the negative impact of inflation on your money and investments, you must start thinking about stocks and their ability to do more for you than anything else.