Couples and Money Management

In the last month or so, JP and I have been revisiting our life goals. Since relocating and finding work, we now have a better grip on our financial situation and therefore can make better projections on our finances.

We basically wrote down our goals in order of importance and plotted them along a timeline. Our plans are quite ambitious but within the realm of possibility. We figured how much money and time we’d need to achieve each goal. It’s not that we haven’t done this before, but after going through a big transition like moving, it was good for us to check in to see whether we’re still on track. When life gets busy, it’s easy to forget your ‘why.’ If you wander too far off from your plans, your spending gets sloppy and problems arise from there. It was a good exercise in getting refocussed on what we want.

We also made adjustments to how we monitor our spending. We created a shared spreadsheet on Google that we can each access on our phones and computers. Whenever we buy something or pay a bill, we enter it on the spreadsheet. We considered using mint.com to track our spending and savings, but it can’t properly factor in all of our investment accounts where we put all of our savings. I don’t really mind having to do things more manually as it’s more interactive. Doing things this way encourages us to talk more about our expenses, which ultimately has led us to make huge improvements in our strategies.

Couples have their own ways of managing money. Some couples split every shared expense down the middle to the cent, and save and spend the rest how they see fit. Some couples rely on one spouse to do most or all of the money managing. We try to do everything together. There isn’t one right way to do this, as long as it works well.

JP and I try to account for everything. When we want to buy something extra, we pitch to the other one like it’s Dragon’s Den. This, I recognize, is not how most people want to operate! Keep in mind that we normally use up all of our savings to invest. Anything frivolous takes away from each other’s ability to buy stocks, so it better be good. We still treat ourselves, as long as we budget for it. As much as we like talking about stocks and the markets, talking about our financial logistics is just as important.

Within days of determining that one of our goals is to invest in a snowbird property within the next year, we booked ourselves to go to Costa Rica to start looking around. I love goals!

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Having said all that, we both just transferred money to each of our TFSAs. We spent this morning looking for some decent picks, but we can’t find anything worth investing in this week. The only good ones were in the gold sector, but right now neither of us is interested in the goldies. The market has gone straight up for almost two months and needs to take a breather. If the market resets on the monthly or weekly charts, we might find better picks — at least we’ll be funded and ready for when the opportunity is there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock Picking – Part 2: Determine Your Investment Goals

Part 2: Determine Your Investment Goals

Objective: Identify your investment objectives first, and then let them guide you when you’re choosing a stock.


The main objective for investing in anything is to make money. With stocks, you make money two ways by selling your shares at a higher price than you paid and from dividend payments. Additionally, your decision to invest in a stock could be supported by a number of other reasons. Such reasons will guide you in the selection process.

Here are some reasons to buy a stock:

  • To fund your retirement 
  • For faster portfolio growth
  • To generate dividend income
  • You see potential growth in a particular sector, so you want a good stock from that sector
  • The economy is looking to slow down, so you want to invest in a defensive stock
  • The economy has been in a slump for a while but now business activity is starting to pick up, so you want to buy stocks to get in on the action
  • You like a company for its products, services, or growth potential, so you want to be a shareholder.

My investment objectives vary as I want to invest for the long-term (a fun and comfy retirement life) and the short-term (concerts, trips, and buying a couple of properties in Canada and somewhere hot).

For my retirement portfolio, it’s all about the long game and I’m looking to invest in something that will do me well for years, even decades. So, I look for stocks that have ‘blue chip’ qualities: they pay dividends, they’re well-known, well-established and have been around for a long time, and they usually offer more than one type of product or service which allows them to adapt to various consumer demands and trends. It’s also a bonus when the stocks are in defensive sectors such as utilities and consumer staples. I don’t do much analysis here, I apply a very basic, rudimentary logic.

There is no guarantee these stocks won’t suffer when the economy is slow, but the idea is that even during tough times, they’ll do better or suffer less, and they’ll still likely pay you dividends. If their stock prices take a hit, I’ll likely buy more shares when they start to recover because they’ll be cheaper.

For my swing trades, I look for stocks that look like they’ll do well over the next few months to a year. I look for typically strong stocks that have been quiet for a while and haven’t seen much trading action. When this happens, it’s usually because their sectors have also been quiet. If all the stocks in a particular sector have been down for a while, I’ll narrow down my selection based on the stock price and volume. (See Stock Picking – Part 1.)

The selection process for my swing trades is more involved as I use a very basic form of technical analysis of a stock’s price history to help me decide on where I’m going to buy and where I’m likely going to sell. Technical analysis is about analyzing the price history of a stock in relation to its trading volume, sector, and market environment. 

Many people dispute the validity of technical analysis and prefer to examine the fundamentals of a company’s value in relation to its share price instead. They’re all valid to some degree and many financial pros analyze both the technical and fundamental information.

I prefer to analyze charts because I’d rather see if I’m paying much more than others who got in earlier than me. The lower the price I pay for a stock, the more confident I am in the trade. It’s not a guarantee that the price won’t go lower, but even if it does, I will suffer less by getting in at a lower price than if I bought a stock after it became hot and expensive. I never buy a stock after it makes the news because it’s usually too expensive by then.

chart-1d

Above is a very basic chart of a stock that I actually own. I consider a stock to be ‘quiet’ if it’s trading sideways (the first horizontal line). Think of a stock’s price in terms of flying in an airplane; trading sideways is like starting on the runway. I try to buy either when it’s still on the runway or just as it’s taking off (no higher than where the airplane is). So I just have a quick glance at a stock’s chart to determine if it’s just taken off or if it’s gone far beyond the clouds. If it has long taken off already, I’ll just wait for another sideways setup. Sometimes this wait time could take months to years and I’ll just keep checking the charts every now and then.

For years, I’ve been using freestockcharts.com to look up charts for Canadian and U.S. stocks. It’s FREE and the features and tools for the charts are very similar to what you would use if you had a pro trading account with a brokerage. To look up a stock, you just type the company name and you can select it from the list of options it provides. Sometimes a company will trade on both the Canadian and US stock exchanges, so be sure you’re selecting the proper exchange for you. There are many short and informative tutorials available on its site and on YouTube.

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I look at the charts for everything I buy for both long-term buys and shorter-term swing trades as my goal is always to buy shares at lower prices. For the long-term trades, it’s more important that the stocks meet some ‘blue chip’ criteria. For the swing trades, I rely more on technical analysis, the sectors, and the markets.

Next time, I’ll get into how I analyze sectors and markets!

 

 

Basic Guidelines to Debt Reduction

debt

Whether you’re trying to aggressively pay off your debts or saving for some big goal (like buying a home), the principles of money management are very similar. In many ways, the way you live your life may seem the same because the key to long-term success is more about establishing good ongoing habits and making them a part of your regular decision-making process. In other words, all goals involve a plan, some structure, discipline in practice, the determination to stay on track, and faith in the process.

If you have debts, you can’t successfully pay them down without accepting and following these fundamental guidelines:

Get rid of the high-interest debts first and avoid incurring this kind of debt ever again. 

When you make a loan payment, a big part of it goes to interest and rest goes to the principal amount that you borrowed. The higher the interest, the harder it is to pay off the borrowed amount. Paying off the high-interest debts first will mean paying less interest overall. Credit cards are typically the high-interest culprits. Once you pay off your credit cards, be sure to pay off the full balance each month going forward.

Consolidate your debts wisely.

You could reduce the high-interest debts by consolidating them into a low-interest loan such as a credit line with the bank. If you have student loans from the Canadian government, then you could be getting a tax credit back from the interest  portion of your repayment — you may want to hold off on consolidating them with your other debts and pay these off separately.

If you’re not able to get a low-interest credit line, then proceed to pay off the debt with the smallest balance first (of course, while paying the minimums on your other debts). Once that’s paid off, then pay off the next smallest balance and keep going until you slay the rest of them. Some credit cards offer very low to zero percent interest for a limited amount of time (usually a year). If it’s realistic to pay the full balance off within those time constraints, you could consider transferring your other debt balances to such credit cards for a service charge. But please remember…

Do not increase your debts.

…just because you transferred your credit card balances to lower-interest options doesn’t mean it’s time to go shopping again. If you can’t take your own debt takedown seriously, then you can’t expect others to take your goals seriously. If the temptation is too much to handle, cancel those cards. 

Cut your costs and spending every which way. 

You must be ruthless when it comes to reducing your bills and expenses. There are endless ways to cut costs and the internet is bursting with budgeting tips. Paying off debts doesn’t mean enduring years of suffering. You can still have fun and reward yourself from time to time — you just have to spend wisely and get creative with low-budget options. I’ve created ‘Fun’ancial Tidbits to inspire wise spending and mindful money management. Additionally, it’s essential that you address any emotional spending habits that weaken your will (like gambling or a shopping addiction) because caving into these habits even just once will sabotage your efforts. 

Have a good, solid budget that you can work with.

Some periods will be tougher than others as you tackle your debt. “Loan Payments” is going to be a major part of your budget for a while. If your budget is complicated, overly ambitious, and not realistic, you could be setting yourself up for possible failure. You should overestimate your expenses as it’s easier to end up with a surplus than it is to get blindsided by an unexpected deficit. It’s also a good idea to forecast your budget ahead by a few months to factor in upcoming events, birthdays, holidays, annual expenses, etc. That way, you can get more strategic ahead of time by reducing your spending further or picking up extra work to make up the difference or to catch up faster.

Get professional assistance from reputable financial institutions. 

You might feel like your debt situation offers no hope. The folks at your bank are pros and have seen it all. If you’re shy about going in to talk to someone in person, you can call them and ask them for advice and they can provide service over the phone. They can advise you on your loan payment options and various strategies. These advisors can surprise you with helpful things you maybe never thought of. If you give them a chance to support you, you increase your chances of succeeding in paying off your debts.

Share your goals with your loved ones.

It’s understandable if you want to keep your financial woes a private matter; you either don’t want to stress others out or be judged by your problems. You might feel alone and get stressed out as you work hard to unburden yourself of debts. It’s nice to get emotional support from people who really care about you. With team support, you can share stuff, exchange money-saving ideas, and have low-budget gatherings. Heck, you’ll probably find out who your real friends are!

The journey towards financial freedom can seem long and arduous. You have to know that there are many folks out there, just like you, who have worked through seemingly impossible situations to pay off their debts. They put their minds to it, created a plan, and learned a new set of money management skills that set them up for financial success later on. Overcoming a hurdle like this will give you the confidence and good habits to successfully tackle your future goals. 

YOU GOT THIS!