Your Special 4/20 Newsletter of 2017: Medicinal Stocks

“What weed stock should I buy?”

If there is one question I am asked the most, it’s the cannabis question. I’m asked about this more than whether to buy Facebook, Apple, or Lululemon. I don’t know anything about cannabis strains, but I can speak a bit more about cannabis stocks.


2016 to 2017

Last year I posted a newsletter on this celebrated day. I listed a few stocks to check out:

  • Canopy Growth Corporation | Ticker symbol CGC.V | $2.60
  • Aphria Incorporated | APH.V | $1.56
  • OrganiGram | OGI.V | $1.10
  • Mettrum Health | MT. V | $1.66
  • Emerald Health Botanicals | EMH.V | $ 0.17

This is where they’re at now:

  • Canopy Growth Corp.| Ticker symbol now WEED.TO on the TSX | $10.24
  • Aphria Inc. | APH.TO now on the TSX | $7
  • OrganiGram | $2.87
  • Mettrum Health | It halted trading at $7.05 because it’s merging with Canopy Growth Corporation
  • Emerald Health Botanicals| $ 1.54

WOW.

I wanted to buy all of them out of pure excitement, but at the time, it was a decision between me and JP. We decided on Aphria, mainly because of its price and proven earnings.


Cannabis presents a new industry for the public, and it’s still in its early stages as it’s working its way through various long and rigorous legalization processes. You can’t expect this journey to be straight and easy, but it’s going to happen whether you agree with legalization or not. (Interesting personal observation: Among the people who ask me what weed stocks to buy, half of them are very conservative and would never smoke it. The other half smoke it and still have shown no indication of buying any of these stocks.)

I remember the time when Colorado and the few other states were legalizing. It was impossible to tell which weed stocks to buy on the US exchanges. They each had the patterns of the new publicly traded company in a speculative industry: cheap with wild swings in volume and price moves. I had to wonder if a company was going places or was just another pump and dump.

I watched a lot of media coverage on Colorado. There was definitely a saturation of industry players – in other words, too many suppliers. Some went just as quickly as they arrived. The stronger, more resilient, established, and adaptive ones survived and endured. Others joined forces and resources to become bigger companies. It will be interesting to see how the industry plays out in Canada.

I’d purchased a couple of other weed stocks since, both of which trade on the TSX Venture Exchange. I bought shares of:

  • Maple Leaf Green World Inc. | MGW.V | 0.62 and
  • The Hydropothecary Corporation | THCX.V |$2.28

I did a quick search and found other stocks with good trading volume:

  • ICC International Cannabis Corp. | ICC.V | $1.29
  • Aurora Cannabis Inc. | ACB.V | $2.84
  • CanniMed Therapeutics Inc. | CMED.TO | $11.61

Oh! And I love that Horizons has created a new ETF: Horizons Medicinal Marijuana Life Sciences ETF (ticker symbol HMMJ.TO, $10.80). It’s got a wonderful mix of medicinal cannabis stocks from Canada, the US, and the UK, including one of my portfolio darlings, Aphria. It also owns some of the stocks mentioned in this newsletter so far. At some point, this ETF will start paying distributions (none yet). If this is a long-term investment for you, then you might want to hold this in your RRSP to avoid withholding taxes.

There are a few things to note about Canadian cannabis stocks. They’re inexpensive and they all overreact to any cannabis information that comes out of Trudeau’s mouth. They settle down after the market reaction to any news and shape up again for more investors to get on board before the prices go up for another run. It’s generally been run after run at higher and higher prices.

Most of these stocks trade very similarly to each other, with only their prices and trading ranges that might differ. If your stock isn’t moving like the others, you might have to wait longer to better see whether or not it’s a dud before getting rid of it. It also might just be a company that needs a lot more time before it proves itself to the market.

If you’re considering buying shares of cannabis stock, you’d have to look deeper into the company’s fundamentals. Remember, because they’re new and in their early phases of development, they all promise growth. I would pay most attention to company earnings and pick the one generating profits already.


The Cannabis Industry vs. the Market

Without trying to sound the alarm, I will strongly suggest that I feel that the market is going to have a major correction soon. The market had a huge nine-year run. We’re now facing rising inflation rates, a new US president, and heavier selling volume in the market as of late. Major stocks that had a good run outshining the market, are showing signs that their investors are now being cautious, even uncertain.

As proactive investors start to unload their positions, they’ll be executing their defensive plays (getting into utilities and consumer staples), as well as looking for what is trading on its own page and less affected by market moves. I think that cannabis stocks, given their industry newness and lower prices, will provide that opportunity for investors.

You might feel conflicted about cannabis and if you do, then you should probably feel the same way about alcohol. As we all know, booze was once outlawed and look at it now. The same will happen to weed. They say if you can’t beat them, then join them. What’s nice about a cannabis stock is that you don’t have to smoke it to own it.

 

 

 

 

The Transparent RRSP: Markets Closed

No actions were taken the week of April 10

This week has been a busy one for me. All week, I was getting my tax stuff in order. No, I haven’t filed yet! If you saw what I had to do to get ‘er done, you’d understand why I was procrastinating. If that’s not enough, I’m in the middle of moving.

The dreadful task of packing always necessitates decluttering. Moving forces me to ruthlessly get rid of what I no longer want or need. For the last month, I’d been going through my things and filling up boxes and bags of stuff I knew had no place in our lives anymore.

This drive to purge shifted to my TFSA. Mid-week, JP recommended that I sell two of my stocks he noticed were underperforming for a long time. They were in the money but had barely budged for a year. I sold them, then I sold four more stocks. I had way too many stocks – we’re talking 33 in this one account! I won’t even get into what’s in my US trading account. 33 is more than I could manage, but I guess I just kept buying them the way my brothers buy shoes and ball caps. This is what can happen if you pay very little in commissions per trade.

After we had a decent market last week, it was easy to see who the laggers were in my portfolio. I don’t mind active stocks that go up and even down, but I do mind the stocks that just don’t move at all. A healthy stock needs steady volume and a decent amount of movement. Without enough investor interest, they’re just duds.

Today, the Canadian and US markets were closed for Good Friday. The volume in the markets was low which is typical before a holiday weekend. People either don’t take on new positions or they sell or reduce their positions because they don’t want to hold them over a long weekend.

I feel lighter with fewer stocks to manage (yet I still own quite a few!) and more cash in my account. I might buy more shares of stocks I already own and am happy with. I’ll see what the market does next week and what my stocks do in relation to the market. Now, back to packing!

The Transparent RRSP: Post #13

No action was taken the week of March 20

This week felt like my own personal spring break. I’ve just been waiting for the market to pull back. When the market is uninspiring, I’m uninspired to do much in that department. When this happens, most stock charts look unpromising to me. Being patient can be boring; it is, however, a necessary virtue for a trader to have.

In my freed up time, I managed to catch up on some of my reading. JP and I typically have a number of books, magazines, and articles littered around our house. Depending on where I end up sitting, I pick up and read whatever happens to be right next to me. 

The last couple of weeks, I found myself focussing on three of the twenty or so items within my lazy reach. I’ve been reading Felix Martin’s Money: The Unauthorized Biography, Michael Lewis’ first hit book, Liar’s Poker, and Joseph Nocera’s, “The Ga-Ga Years,” an old article that was published in Esquire magazine in 1988. Interestingly, at one point this week, I found the subject matter of all three works intersecting at the topics of bonds, money market funds, and beating the market. To boot, they were all referencing the same point in financial history’s timeline: the years leading up to the stock market crash of 1987. I am not a fast reader, but by golly do I wish I could just read it all in one sitting right now. I just find people’s different experiences and ideas on money fascinating.

I have a very loosely formed concept of money that’s been evolving since I started working and saving it. While I can’t say that my understanding is advanced by any stretch, I can say that it’s deepening the more I learn about it and invest it. Money is one of those human inventions – a “social technology” as Martin calls it – that is fluid instead of concrete in its nature. Different forms of it, whether as a currency, a security, a financial product, or a means of exchange, can and will go up and down in value. As I spent more time watching the markets, it became increasingly apparent to me that these fluctuations are created by us. We get optimistic about the promise of growth or the next big opportunity. People pump money towards potential. As more people buy in, prices go up, cash runs low, and perceptions start shifting; as people start to cash out, fear of losing runs high. It’s amazing to think how the general agreement of our feelings about something has the power to change the market value of our investment accounts.

Beating the market is what every investor or fund manager wants to achieve. I’ve done it. I’ve also been horribly beaten by it. I learned that the best way to not get beaten by it is to sit patiently and wait out any fear or pessimism until optimism sets in again. Until then, I’ll just keep reading about the rise and fall of others instead of letting history repeat itself with me. 

 

 

The Transparent RRSP: Post #8

Actions Taken the Week of February 20th
  • Bought 24 shares of Canadian Life Companies Split Corp. (ticker symbol: LFE.TO) at $6.12 per share on Wednesday, February 22.
  • This cost me $146.88 plus 0.24 cents of commission.

I had S147.60 left in the RRSP so I couldn’t afford to buy 25 shares, which would have made it a better bundle to manage. When you buy shares in ‘odd lots’ (not by the 100s), you sometimes run the risk of your order not all getting filled at the very price you want; or if you pay higher commissions per transaction, you will get better value for your trade costs when you buy in round lots of 100 shares, 200 shares, 300 shares, etc.

Times like this make me feel like a teenager who spent the rest of her allowance too quickly (only here I didn’t blow it all on bubble gum and nail polish). I now have 0.48 cents left in my RRSP, which means it’s definitely due for a re-up. To stay true to my commitment of regular monthly contributions, I will deposit another $150 at the beginning of March.


I found this stock when I was perusing the ‘Canadian Common Stocks’ tab on freestockcharts.com on Wednesday morning.

lfe

LFE.TO on freestockcharts.com

 

Even though the monthly chart wasn’t my ideal setup, the daily chart was too nice to pass up. When you see a three-month long consolidation with that kind of volume action, you pay attention. This could still consolidate longer, which means I might have to sit uncomfortably for a while, but if this continues to tighten up, I will buy more either in my RRSP (when I’m better funded) or my TFSA – or both.

Also, this investment company is a portfolio of four major life insurance companies, so if you can’t afford to buy shares of those individual companies, you can of this one and receive a nice monthly dividend to boot!


Don’t forget the RRSP deadline of March 1, 2017!

Claim your RRSP deductions and get a bigger tax return!

And when you get your tax return, invest it!

Stock Video!

Watch the Loonie to Toonie Stock Video!

Finally! My stock video is ready for the world – specifically the world of people interested in reading stock charts, which I believe is a small, yet growing world. My hope is that one day, reading charts of investments is no longer a practice unique to investment pros, but a basic skill that we all have.

You can hit it big in stocks without ever having to read a chart, but for me, it’s key to my decision process. I created this video to provide a more visual supplement to all the information that I’ve been sharing on how I find and select stocks. 

I’m often asked where to find stocks. I feel it’s important to not only tell you where I find stocks but how I decide on which ones to pay attention to. I hope this helps you in your investment endeavours! 

Canadian Stocks $10 to $20

This is a continuation of last week’s picks taken from the XIC ETF, only this post focuses on stocks between $10 and $20.

Some of these pay dividends. I’m only making special note of the ones that pay monthly because personally, I’m very drawn to the concept of investment income coming in more frequently. Some of the others listed pay quarterly, and some none at all.

Remember to please always double check the facts for yourself and invest in accordance with your plan. Factor in the stock’s industry/sector, and consider whether you’re investing for income, capital gains, or both.


Top Picks Based on Chart Patterns 

  • ATA – ATS Automation Tooling Systems
  • GEI – Gibson Energy Inc.

Stocks with so-so looking charts but very attractive monthly dividends

  • SPB – Superior Plus (I own this stock. This one could take a LONG time to get beyond the $15 zone but it’ll be well worth it if you’re already in and it does.)
  • VSN – Veresen Inc.
  • RNW – Transalta Renewables Inc.
  • CHE.UN – Chemtrade Logistics Income Fund (This is an income fund.)

Stocks that I’d prefer to consolidate longer

I think these should consolidate for a bit longer, like another one to two months. I mention them now because I think it’s good practice to keep an eye on stocks should they set up later on. 

  • HSE Husky Energy Inc.
  • SES – Secure Energy Services
  • INE – Innergex Renewable Energy Inc.
  • CUF.UN – Cominar Real Estate Investment Trust (This is a REIT.)

 

Things to Ponder

I have missed out on stocks that made incredible moves despite the lack of a good setup and I still do. I also missed out because I just overestimated how much time a stock would take to come around. I’m okay with this now because part of my confidence as a stock investor with a 70% return on my portfolio comes from the following:

  • Looking for and waiting for good setups
  • Taking lesser risk on stocks with less-than-perfect setups by using fewer shares
  • Watching the sectors and the market
  • Having a plan for each stock (dividend income? swing trade for profits? retirement? portfolio diversification? hedge?)
  • Being okay with missing out and not getting into everything that looks good or works
  • Years of experience in the markets

I generally have a relaxed attitude towards my portfolio and how I select for it. If I start making compromised choices, I get stressed out and I either talk myself out of staying in a winner, or I get into something much too late because I spent too much time overanalyzing its potential.

You shouldn’t invest feeling fear, whether it’s the fear of starting out or the fear of missing out (FOMO). If you’re new to investing in stocks, just use less money. If you feeling a bit of FOMO, then you must realize that the stock market isn’t going anywhere and that there will always be another opportunity when you’re more ready.

Honour of the Month

Thank you to Tellwell Publishing for naming me Author of the Month! 

 

It has been quite a journey. I just love that beyond writing a book that I can continue to share, motivate, and help educate others on achieving their financial goals through savvy money management, wise spending, and smart investing.

I’m looking forward to sharing more in the new year!